Archived entries for Videos

Diane Fine Lecture video


If you were not able to attend Diane Fine’s lecture, of if you wish to listen to it again, visit the above link to view a video capture of the event. Diane’s was the 3rd Annual Bernstein Book Arts speaker. For more information about her exhibit at the Kohler Art Library and about her visit, please visit the link, Diane Fine Bernstein Book Art Lecture

How to make Methyl Cellulose paste.

https://youtu.be/xC6p63xnSj0
I don’t use mythel cellulose paste too often. I like when a paste give a stronger bond. But when you need a paste to make book cloth, methyl cellulose is a one paste to use. I keep methyl cellulose powder in the classroom as you never know when you might need it. When I need paste to make book cloth, I like to have a thicker paste. In this video, I heated water till approximately 150 degrees (70 celsius) and then added 18th of a cup of powder to 1 cup (275 ml) of hot water. I needed a full cup of paste to make the two sheets of book cloth. I did have some left over. It is better to make more than you need. It really does take time to fulling formulate. I would hate to be in a situation where I needed a bit more paste and had to make it on the spot. As it happened another student was working with a faux leather book cover and wanted to try using a mix of PVA and Methyl cellulose (MC). When you mix the two at 50% to 50%, you keep some of the bonding qualities of the PVA but gain some open time to work the book cover. At the end of the video can see that the PVA does not look all that different. It is important to label your jars if you want to be sure you know which jar contains the past or adhesive you want to use. I will be working on a video on how I used the book cloth from this vide.

How to Make Book Cloth


Book cloth is made in many colors and out of many different materials. But sometimes, you just have to use a fabric for a book cover. The fabric pattern or color might be just what you want to use for the cover. This video will show you how to make book cloth out of fabric. In this video I used some vinyl drafting board cover under the fabric. Many people use glass or plexiglass and some use large sheet of binders board. If you want to make book cloth you should buy enough to experiment. Your fabric might need some adjustment to how this one was made. It might take an extra few steps, but the fabric might make your book exactly what you want it to be.

Making a photopolymer plate from a text file


Students often ask me how they can print a file from a page layout program. It is simply. Once a file has been designed to your liking, export the file to a PDF document. That file can be printed using an inkjet printer with black ink and transparency film. It you want a file that is much higher in resolution, you can contact a service bureau and request the file be printed using a Linotronic Imagesetter. This video outlines the steps that are necessary. Thanks to Elizabeth Jean Younce for her help making the negative. You can watch other videos about making photopolymer plates on my photopolymer playlist on YouTube at this link.

Bookbinding tutorial: pamphlet stich

Early in the semester, you will learn how to sew a book using the pamphlet stitch. The single signature book offers creative options for a book. Books that have spines less than 5 inches in length, you might want to use a three hole sewing pattern. Written instructions for a three hole pamphlet stitch can be seen at this link. In this video, a five hole sewing pattern is demonstrated. A book from a signature is often called a chapbook. In commercial printing job, this type of binding is called saddle stitch. This video illustrates a hand stapler is used in saddle stitching. Whatever you wish to call this type of book, the pamphlet stitch is used in many creative book projects. This pamphlet book gallery has some student examples.

In this demonstration an 18/3 thread was used. You can learn some information about bookbinding threads in this blog post.

Tortillas La Iguana

 (Jim Escalante)
What started out as an experiment in making paper from corn husks, has turned into a small print for the HWT Wayzgoose 2014 on Sunday, November 8th. Instead of forming regular sheets of paper from the corn husk pulp, we poured the pulp into a variety of round shapes. When the paper dried it resembled tortillas so much that I had to create a new brand, Tortillas La Iguana! Thanks to Tracy Honn from the Silver Buckle Press for suggesting how I should print the plate on different sizes of paper. The classroom’s Vandercook 219 has a set of rollers for inking that lift up enough to not touch the paper as the platen cylinder rolls over during the printing run. Our friends at Boxcar Press made the plates for this run. Below is short video on the printing steps. At the press is Julie Marie Copenhagen.

Getting set for an evening at MMoCA


On November 13th, 2014, a few students and I will be working on a quick book project as part of the “Under the Influence” program at 6 pm. One of the book structures we will explore is the Turkish Map Fold. Thanks to Sona Pastel-Daneshgar for demonstrating in the video.



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